Apple - Gala
Apple - Granny Smith
Apple - Red Delicious
Apple - Pink Lady
Asparagus
Avocado
Banana - Lady Finger
Banana
Beans
Beetroot
Blueberries
Broccoli
Broccolini
Brussel Sprouts
Cabbage - Drumhead
Capsicum
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn
Cucumbers Continental
Eggplant
Eshallots
Figs
Grapefruit Red Ruby
Grapes - Red
Grapes - White
Honeydew Melon
Iceberg Lettuce
Kiwi Fruit
Lemons Australian
Limes
Mangoes season finished
Nectarines & Peaches
Onions - Brown
Onions - Red
Oranges Navel
Oranges New Season Valencias NA
Oranges 3kg
Passionfruit
Paw Paw
Nectarines & Peaches
Pears Burre Bosc
Pears Packham
Pineapple
Plums
Potatoes Brushed
Pumpkin
Rockmelon
Raspberries
Snow Peas
Spinach
Spring Onion
Strawberries
Sweet Potato
Tomato
Tomato - Roma
Tomato - Truss
Tomato- Cherry
Tomato - Egg
Watermelon
Zucchini
Cherries

What’s in a colour?

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Aussie produce takes centre stage as September rolls through. Now is the ideal time to ‘eat the rainbow’. Nutritionists place fruit and veges into different colour categories, each colour can indicate the presence of various vitamins and minerals.

The five colour categories are:

RED
Red fruits and vegetables are coloured by a natural plant pigment called lycopene. Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant. These also contain anthocyanins, flavonoids (flavonols) and saponins. They provide anti-inflammatory properties that are thought to be important in protecting against diseases. Think red berries, capsicum and apples.

ORANGE/YELLOW
Carotenoids give this group their vibrant colour. These fruit and vegetables contain vitamin C, folate, potassium and vitamin A, all great for immune system function and healthy skin.  Reach for oranges, carrots and lemons.

PURPLE /BLUE
The plant pigment anthocyanin is what gives blue/purple fruits and vegetables their distinctive colour. Anthocyanin also has antioxidant properties that protect cells from damage. Go for blueberries, purple grapes, eggplant and red cabbage.

GREEN
Green vegetables contain a range of phytochemicals including carotenoids, indoles and saponins, all of which have health properties. Leafy greens such as spinach and broccoli are also excellent sources of folate. Eat asparagus, green beans, celery, spinach and avocados.

BROWN/WHITE
White fruits and vegetables contain a range of health-promoting phytochemicals such as allicin (found in garlic) which is known for its antiviral and antibacterial properties. Other members of the white group, such as bananas and potatoes are also a good source of potassium.

Eat a variety of fruits and veges of different colours and feel the difference this Spring!